2019 Fantasy Football Rookie Roundup: Seattle Seahawks

The 2019 NFL Draft is in the rearview mirror, and it’s time for the next part of the NFL calendar: massive, rampant speculation about guys who have never played in the NFL before or have never played together or both. They will go through drills in shorts, and we will endlessly project and prognosticate on their fantasy football futures. However, there are 78 guys who might have fantasy football relevance after their names were called in Nashville at the end of April. Our goal with our Fantasy Football Rookie Roundup series is to give you a quick hit on every fantasy football-eligible player drafted in the 2019 NFL Draft. By the end, you’ll know these guys better than their mother does. Because it’s not like their mothers are necessarily good at fantasy football. 

The Seattle Seahawks spent 2018 vociferously establishing the run, then drafted three wide receivers in the 2019 NFL draft. They also drafted a running back with an exceptionally apt name. What, then, of their fantasy football prospects in 2019? Does Doug Baldwin leave a surprising opening in the target ratio? Does hyperathletic freak D.K. Metcalf win at the next level? Will he get popped for the least surprising PED suspension of all time? There are a lot of questions with the 2019 Seattle Seahawks rookies, and we’ll break them all down below. 

Round 2, Pick 64 Overall – D.K. Metcalf, Wide Receiver, Ole Miss 

There isn’t a more divisive fantasy football rookie than D.K. Metcalf. He popped up after the college season looking like someone had attached a hose to him and pumped up his muscles. Or maybe he has one of those plugs like in a kiddie pool. Either way, he showed up completely jacked out of his mind at the combine. Fortunately for him, his game isn’t built on agility or change-of-direction, or else the momentum of trying to put a keg’s worth of muscle weight on a tendon when changing directions would lead to countless knee injuries. 

That having been said, he’s the opposite of what you would picture with that characterization. “Lumbering” doesn’t come close to describing his speed, as his 4.33-40 yard dash pops out on film. His tape shows mostly go routes, with a curl thrown in here and there for good measure. He runs straight behind the defense most of the time, which is good enough to have some usefulness in the NFL. He’s a physical marvel but needs a lot of work on being a football player. 

Unfortunately, he finds himself on the Seattle Seahawks, who spent 2018 redefining “establishing the run” under Offensive Coordinator Brian Schottenheimer. Throw in that the Seattle Seahawks already have a guy who loves to run in long, straight lines (Tyler Lockett) and you have a recipe for Metcalf not doing much in 2019 (though the inevitable Dion Lewis/Derrick Henry photo but with Metcalf and Lockett will be great). He will likely pop up here and there, but the offense and his skill set do not scream “immediately helping your fantasy team.” No Seattle rookie WR is likely to be a useful fantasy commodity in his rookie year, but if anyone would, it’s probably the next guy. 

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Round 4, Pick 120 Overall – Gary Jennings Jr, Wide Receiver, West Virginia 

Gary Jennings, alongside Tyler Lockett, D.K. Metcalf, and Seahawks sixth-round pick Travis Homer represents a change to the Seattle offense. While they will still likely establish the run, or die trying, they seem set up to take bigger home run plays. That makes someone like Gary Jennings intriguing as a late flier in best ball leagues, though I would not lean on him in any season-long fantasy football leagues. 

Gary Jennings Jr. has some incredibly, wildly inconsistent tape. He looks like a crazy different player not only from game to game, but half to half. He alternates between a lot of routes that’ don’t really go anywhere. Fake bubble screens, lazy curls, squirting out into the flat while the play develops on the other side. Just a whole lot of garbage on screen. Then, all of a sudden, West Virginia would remember he exists, and he blasts three amazing plays where he would destroy his man at the line, run past the safety, and make a massive play. He’s also great at finding the soft spot in a zone, which will help bolster his fantasy football numbers in PPR leagues. 

I expect Gary Jennings to have a bit of a learning curve, and given that he will be the third fiddle in a passing offense that is more underutilized than D.K. Metcalf’s shirts at pre-draft meetings, it’s unlikely he will have a ton of fantasy football upside. Unless, of course, they change everything. The loss of Doug Baldwin (and his replacement with Metcalf and Jennings), the re-signing of Russell Wilson and the suddenly strong offensive line point to the Seahawks potentially moving towards a big play offense. If that’s the case, expect Gary Jennings name to start popping up in midseason pickup pieces. I’m not overly confident that’ll happen with Brian “curls” Schottenheimer, but it’s certainly possible. 

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 Round 6, Pick 204 – Travis Homer, Running Back, Miami 

Oh man, requiescat in pace to J.D. McKissic and C.J. Prosise. The two oft-injured Seahawks will likely be no more with the acquisition of yet another small, fast third down back. Homer didn’t get a lot of passes in college, but he was smooth in both catching them and immediately knowing what to do with the ball. Swing passes to Homer, and other methods of getting him the ball in space are the best bet for him scoring any fantasy football points this year. He’s not good between the tackles. At 5’10”, 201 pounds, it’s probably best that he doesn’t bounce between them, given that he can’t really shed a tackle to save his life. 

Where does Homer make his hay? In the open field. He is absolutely electric when it’s him and a gang of guys trying to catch up to him. He’s hard to tackle in the open field, and he’s always churning for more yards. He’s a shifty, open runner, and if you want to know his running style, call it the opposite of Chris Carson. He doesn’t want that heat in the open field, but he’s talented enough to get around the guy trying to lay the wood.  

He’s useless for fantasy football, in the same way, that McKissic and Prosise have been mostly useless. He’s third on the depth chart and doesn’t have a great profile to take over as the lead back in the case of Carson and Rashaad Penny going down with injuries. His role is unlikely to change in year one, so you can safely ignore him in fantasy football drafts, though he may make it into a DFS lineup or two. 

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 Round 7, Pick 236 – John Ursua, Wide Receiver, Hawaii 

I’ll be short with this. He’s short. I’ll be light with my words. He’s light. At 5’9” 178, he had a profile that could thrive in college, but not in the pros. He plays like he’s a bigger guy, and if he was Julio Jones sized, he probably would have gone in the third or fourth round. He doesn’t have the skillset for his height and weight in the NFL, as a shifty speedster. He’s shifty, but not overly athletic. He’s also likely at his NFL ceiling, given that he’s already 25 years old. That’s older than Amari Cooper, JuJu Smith-Schuster, and Tyreek Hill. Don’t count on him ever becoming a fantasy football asset. 

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2019 OUTLOOK

About Jeff Krisko

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