Fantasy Football Jordan Reed Player Profile

If you love stressing out whether or not your tight end will play this week, then this fantasy football Jordan Reed  player profile is the one for you.

As we gear up to the start of the NFL season, Football Absurdity is going to bring you a comprehensive breakdown of every notable player that will be available in fantasy football drafts.  When you don’t see us talking about Christine Michael or Mike Davis, don’t get mad at us for neglecting your favorite sleeper.  Get mad at yourself for having bad taste in football players.  We are only focusing on the top-rated running backs in standard scoring and points per game leagues.

With my player profiles, I’ve only decided to go back to look at their fantasy scoring for three years.  I could show you lists from earlier, but at the skill positions, I think three years is plenty to see what a player does.  I’ve also added a chart for their usage over that time span.  We will try to determine, based on those two factors, where the best wide receiver value lies.

Fantasy Football Jordan Reed

Current ADP (As of 9/3/2018):

Standard: TE10, #88 overall.

PPR: TE10, #84 overall.

 

Stats:

FANTASY FOOTBALL JORDAN REED SCORING — STANDARD

Rank Total Points PPG Rank PPG
2017 43 33.1 12 5.5
2016 9 104.6 2 8.7
2015 2 161.2 2 11.5

FANTASY FOOTBALL JORDAN REED SCORING — PPR

Rank Total Points PPG Rank PPG
2017 36 60.1 9 10.0
2016 9 170.6 1 14.2
2015 2 248.2 1 17.7

FANTASY FOOTBALL JORDAN REED USAGE

Targets Targets Per Game Receptions Receptions Per Game Catch Rate
2017 35 5.8 27 4.5 77%
2016 89 7.4 66 5.5 74%
2015 114 8.1 87 6.2 76%

 

Overview: Jordan Reed, when healthy and on the field, is an absolutely unstoppable force of nature. Nothing tells the story of his upside and downside more than his fantasy ranks at season’s end and on a per-game basis. He absolutely dominates on a game-by-game basis, but he’s a risk to miss that week’s game literally every single week. He hasn’t played in the preseason due to—surprise—medical reasons. Should he play and he & Alex Smith get their acts together, he could be a steal.

Strategy: Take him if you want to, but this late in draft season, it’s an extremely risky proposition. You’ll need to devote an open roster slot to rostering a second tight end. Why? He still hasn’t played in the preseason. Jay Gruden says he’s “on pace” to start week one, but we’ve heard that hundreds of times from him before. Take him when you feel like you can’t live with yourself if he drops past you and breaks all the way out.

Ceiling:  He plays all sixteen games, goes for 100-1,000-10, and finally gives his fantasy football owners what they want from him.

Floor:   What will actually happen is he plays the first quarter of week one, aggravates his foot injury, and comes back in week five. In the second quarter, he’s concussed. He makes it back in week eight. In weeks eight through ten, he posts 200 yards and two scores a game. He then spontaneously combusts on the field at the coinflip in week eleven. Going into 2019, he has a consensus ranking of TE8, with prognosticators noting, “he’s just a pile of ash and bone, but when he’s on the field, he dominates.”

About Jeff Krisko

You can follow me on twitter, @jeffkrisko for the same lukewarm takes you read here.

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